Privacy policy

We are very delight­ed that you have shown inter­est in our enter­prise. Data pro­tec­tion is of a par­tic­u­lar­ly high pri­or­i­ty for the man­age­ment of the Micro­vista GmbH. The use of the Inter­net pages of the Micro­vista GmbH is pos­si­ble with­out any indi­ca­tion of per­son­al data; how­ev­er, if a data sub­ject wants to use spe­cial enter­prise ser­vices via our web­site, pro­cess­ing of per­son­al data could become nec­es­sary. If the pro­cess­ing of per­son­al data is nec­es­sary and there is no statu­to­ry basis for such pro­cess­ing, we gen­er­al­ly obtain con­sent from the data sub­ject. The pro­cess­ing of per­son­al data, such as the name, address, e‑mail address, or tele­phone num­ber of a data sub­ject shall always be in line with the Gen­er­al Data Pro­tec­tion Reg­u­la­tion (GDPR), and in accor­dance with the coun­try-spe­cif­ic data pro­tec­tion reg­u­la­tions applic­a­ble to the Micro­vista GmbH. By means of this data pro­tec­tion dec­la­ra­tion, our enter­prise would like to inform the gen­er­al pub­lic of the nature, scope, and pur­pose of the per­son­al data we col­lect, use and process. Fur­ther­more, data sub­jects are informed, by means of this data pro­tec­tion dec­la­ra­tion, of the rights to which they are enti­tled. As the con­troller, the Micro­vista GmbH has imple­ment­ed numer­ous tech­ni­cal and orga­ni­za­tion­al mea­sures to ensure the most com­plete pro­tec­tion of per­son­al data processed through this web­site. How­ev­er, Inter­net-based data trans­mis­sions may in prin­ci­ple have secu­ri­ty gaps, so absolute pro­tec­tion may not be guar­an­teed. For this rea­son, every data sub­ject is free to trans­fer per­son­al data to us via alter­na­tive means, e.g. by tele­phone.

1. Definitions

The data pro­tec­tion dec­la­ra­tion of the Micro­vista GmbH is based on the terms used by the Euro­pean leg­is­la­tor for the adop­tion of the Gen­er­al Data Pro­tec­tion Reg­u­la­tion (GDPR). Our data pro­tec­tion dec­la­ra­tion should be leg­i­ble and under­stand­able for the gen­er­al pub­lic, as well as our cus­tomers and busi­ness part­ners. To ensure this, we would like to first explain the ter­mi­nol­o­gy used. In this data pro­tec­tion dec­la­ra­tion, we use, inter alia, the fol­low­ing terms: 
  • a) Personal data

    Per­son­al data means any infor­ma­tion relat­ing to an iden­ti­fied or iden­ti­fi­able nat­ur­al per­son (“data sub­ject”). An iden­ti­fi­able nat­ur­al per­son is one who can be iden­ti­fied, direct­ly or indi­rect­ly, in par­tic­u­lar by ref­er­ence to an iden­ti­fi­er such as a name, an iden­ti­fi­ca­tion num­ber, loca­tion data, an online iden­ti­fi­er or to one or more fac­tors spe­cif­ic to the phys­i­cal, phys­i­o­log­i­cal, genet­ic, men­tal, eco­nom­ic, cul­tur­al or social iden­ti­ty of that nat­ur­al person.
  • b) Person concerned

    Data sub­ject is any iden­ti­fied or iden­ti­fi­able nat­ur­al per­son, whose per­son­al data is processed by the con­troller respon­si­ble for the processing.
  • c) Processing

    Pro­cess­ing is any oper­a­tion or set of oper­a­tions which is per­formed on per­son­al data or on sets of per­son­al data, whether or not by auto­mat­ed means, such as col­lec­tion, record­ing, organ­i­sa­tion, struc­tur­ing, stor­age, adap­ta­tion or alter­ation, retrieval, con­sul­ta­tion, use, dis­clo­sure by trans­mis­sion, dis­sem­i­na­tion or oth­er­wise mak­ing avail­able, align­ment or com­bi­na­tion, restric­tion, era­sure or destruction.
  • d) Restriction of processing

    Restric­tion of pro­cess­ing is the mark­ing of stored per­son­al data with the aim of lim­it­ing their pro­cess­ing in the future.
  • e) Profiling

    Pro­fil­ing means any form of auto­mat­ed pro­cess­ing of per­son­al data con­sist­ing of the use of per­son­al data to eval­u­ate cer­tain per­son­al aspects relat­ing to a nat­ur­al per­son, in par­tic­u­lar to analyse or pre­dict aspects con­cern­ing that nat­ur­al person’s per­for­mance at work, eco­nom­ic sit­u­a­tion, health, per­son­al pref­er­ences, inter­ests, reli­a­bil­i­ty, behav­iour, loca­tion or movements.
  • f) Pseudonymization

    Pseu­do­nymi­sa­tion is the pro­cess­ing of per­son­al data in such a man­ner that the per­son­al data can no longer be attrib­uted to a spe­cif­ic data sub­ject with­out the use of addi­tion­al infor­ma­tion, pro­vid­ed that such addi­tion­al infor­ma­tion is kept sep­a­rate­ly and is sub­ject to tech­ni­cal and organ­i­sa­tion­al mea­sures to ensure that the per­son­al data are not attrib­uted to an iden­ti­fied or iden­ti­fi­able nat­ur­al person.
  • g) Controller or person responsible for processing

    Con­troller or con­troller respon­si­ble for the pro­cess­ing is the nat­ur­al or legal per­son, pub­lic author­i­ty, agency or oth­er body which, alone or joint­ly with oth­ers, deter­mines the pur­pos­es and means of the pro­cess­ing of per­son­al data; where the pur­pos­es and means of such pro­cess­ing are deter­mined by Union or Mem­ber State law, the con­troller or the spe­cif­ic cri­te­ria for its nom­i­na­tion may be pro­vid­ed for by Union or Mem­ber State law.
  • h) Processor

    Proces­sor is a nat­ur­al or legal per­son, pub­lic author­i­ty, agency or oth­er body which process­es per­son­al data on behalf of the controller.
  • i) Recipient

    Recip­i­ent is a nat­ur­al or legal per­son, pub­lic author­i­ty, agency or anoth­er body, to which the per­son­al data are dis­closed, whether a third par­ty or not. How­ev­er, pub­lic author­i­ties which may receive per­son­al data in the frame­work of a par­tic­u­lar inquiry in accor­dance with Union or Mem­ber State law shall not be regard­ed as recip­i­ents; the pro­cess­ing of those data by those pub­lic author­i­ties shall be in com­pli­ance with the applic­a­ble data pro­tec­tion rules accord­ing to the pur­pos­es of the processing.
  • j) Third party

    Third par­ty is a nat­ur­al or legal per­son, pub­lic author­i­ty, agency or body oth­er than the data sub­ject, con­troller, proces­sor and per­sons who, under the direct author­i­ty of the con­troller or proces­sor, are autho­rised to process per­son­al data.
  • k) Consent

    Con­sent of the data sub­ject is any freely giv­en, spe­cif­ic, informed and unam­bigu­ous indi­ca­tion of the data subject’s wish­es by which he or she, by a state­ment or by a clear affir­ma­tive action, sig­ni­fies agree­ment to the pro­cess­ing of per­son­al data relat­ing to him or her.

2. Name and address of the controller

Con­troller for the pur­pos­es of the Gen­er­al Data Pro­tec­tion Reg­u­la­tion (GDPR), oth­er data pro­tec­tion laws applic­a­ble in Mem­ber states of the Euro­pean Union and oth­er pro­vi­sions relat­ed to data pro­tec­tion is: Micro­vista GmbH, Am Mönchen­felde 12, 38889 Blanken­burg, Ger­many, Phone: +49 3944 950–50, Email: info@microvista.de, Web­site: https://www.microvista.de

3. Cookies

The Inter­net pages of the Micro­vista GmbH use cook­ies. Cook­ies are text files that are stored in a com­put­er sys­tem via an Inter­net brows­er. Many Inter­net sites and servers use cook­ies. Many cook­ies con­tain a so-called cook­ie ID. A cook­ie ID is a unique iden­ti­fi­er of the cook­ie. It con­sists of a char­ac­ter string through which Inter­net pages and servers can be assigned to the spe­cif­ic Inter­net brows­er in which the cook­ie was stored. This allows vis­it­ed Inter­net sites and servers to dif­fer­en­ti­ate the indi­vid­ual brows­er of the dats sub­ject from oth­er Inter­net browsers that con­tain oth­er cook­ies. A spe­cif­ic Inter­net brows­er can be rec­og­nized and iden­ti­fied using the unique cook­ie ID. Through the use of cook­ies, the Micro­vista GmbH can pro­vide the users of this web­site with more user-friend­ly ser­vices that would not be pos­si­ble with­out the cook­ie set­ting. By means of a cook­ie, the infor­ma­tion and offers on our web­site can be opti­mized with the user in mind. Cook­ies allow us, as pre­vi­ous­ly men­tioned, to rec­og­nize our web­site users. The pur­pose of this recog­ni­tion is to make it eas­i­er for users to uti­lize our web­site. The web­site user that uses cook­ies, e.g. does not have to enter access data each time the web­site is accessed, because this is tak­en over by the web­site, and the cook­ie is thus stored on the user’s com­put­er sys­tem. Anoth­er exam­ple is the cook­ie of a shop­ping cart in an online shop. The online store remem­bers the arti­cles that a cus­tomer has placed in the vir­tu­al shop­ping cart via a cook­ie. The data sub­ject may, at any time, pre­vent the set­ting of cook­ies through our web­site by means of a cor­re­spond­ing set­ting of the Inter­net brows­er used, and may thus per­ma­nent­ly deny the set­ting of cook­ies. Fur­ther­more, already set cook­ies may be delet­ed at any time via an Inter­net brows­er or oth­er soft­ware pro­grams. This is pos­si­ble in all pop­u­lar Inter­net browsers. If the data sub­ject deac­ti­vates the set­ting of cook­ies in the Inter­net brows­er used, not all func­tions of our web­site may be entire­ly usable. 
  • a) Cookies through social media plugins

    Auf unser­er Web­seite wer­den Ver­linkun­gen zu unseren Social Media Seit­en bere­it­gestellt (YouTube, LinkedIn, Xing, Face­book, Insta­gram), was durch die Ein­bet­tung eines Social Media Plu­g­ins geschieht („soziale Net­zw­erk-Icons des Page­builders Ele­men­tor“). Dadurch kön­nen Cook­ies über viele Web­seit­en hin­weg ver­wen­det wer­den und Infor­ma­tio­nen über Ihre Online-Aktiv­itäten sam­meln. Diese Cook­ies wer­den durch Drit­tan­bi­eter wie Werbe- oder Analy­se­un­ternehmen (soziale Net­zw­erke) gesetzt.

4. Collection of general data and information

The web­site of the Micro­vista GmbH col­lects a series of gen­er­al data and infor­ma­tion when a data sub­ject or auto­mat­ed sys­tem calls up the web­site. This gen­er­al data and infor­ma­tion are stored in the serv­er log files. Col­lect­ed may be (1) the brows­er types and ver­sions used, (2) the oper­at­ing sys­tem used by the access­ing sys­tem, (3) the web­site from which an access­ing sys­tem reach­es our web­site (so-called refer­rers), (4) the sub-web­sites, (5) the date and time of access to the Inter­net site, (6) an Inter­net pro­to­col address (IP address), (7) the Inter­net ser­vice provider of the access­ing sys­tem, and (8) any oth­er sim­i­lar data and infor­ma­tion that may be used in the event of attacks on our infor­ma­tion tech­nol­o­gy sys­tems. When using these gen­er­al data and infor­ma­tion, the Micro­vista GmbH does not draw any con­clu­sions about the data sub­ject. Rather, this infor­ma­tion is need­ed to (1) deliv­er the con­tent of our web­site cor­rect­ly, (2) opti­mize the con­tent of our web­site as well as its adver­tise­ment, (3) ensure the long-term via­bil­i­ty of our infor­ma­tion tech­nol­o­gy sys­tems and web­site tech­nol­o­gy, and (4) pro­vide law enforce­ment author­i­ties with the infor­ma­tion nec­es­sary for crim­i­nal pros­e­cu­tion in case of a cyber-attack. There­fore, the Micro­vista GmbH ana­lyzes anony­mous­ly col­lect­ed data and infor­ma­tion sta­tis­ti­cal­ly, with the aim of increas­ing the data pro­tec­tion and data secu­ri­ty of our enter­prise, and to ensure an opti­mal lev­el of pro­tec­tion for the per­son­al data we process. The anony­mous data of the serv­er log files are stored sep­a­rate­ly from all per­son­al data pro­vid­ed by a data sub­ject.

5. Contact possibility via the website

The web­site of the Micro­vista GmbH con­tains infor­ma­tion that enables a quick elec­tron­ic con­tact to our enter­prise, as well as direct com­mu­ni­ca­tion with us, which also includes a gen­er­al address of the so-called elec­tron­ic mail (e‑mail address). If a data sub­ject con­tacts the con­troller by e‑mail or via a con­tact form, the per­son­al data trans­mit­ted by the data sub­ject are auto­mat­i­cal­ly stored. Such per­son­al data trans­mit­ted on a vol­un­tary basis by a data sub­ject to the data con­troller are stored for the pur­pose of pro­cess­ing or con­tact­ing the data sub­ject. There is no trans­fer of this per­son­al data to third parties. 
  • a) Use of Google reCAPTCHA

    reCAPTCHA is a free captcha ser­vice from Google that pro­tects web­sites from spam soft­ware and abuse by non-human vis­i­tors. This ser­vice is most often used when you fill out forms on the Inter­net. A captcha ser­vice is a kind of auto­mat­ic tur­ing test, which is sup­posed to ensure that an action on the inter­net is done by a human being and not by a bot. Clas­si­cal captchas work with small tasks that are easy to solve for humans, but have con­sid­er­able dif­fi­cul­ties for machines. With reCAPTCHA you don’t have to active­ly solve puz­zles any­more. The tool uses mod­ern risk tech­niques to dis­tin­guish humans from bots. Here you only have to tick the text field “I am not a robot” or with Invis­i­ble reCAPTCHA — which we use — even this is no longer nec­es­sary. Through the use of reCAPTCHA, data is trans­mit­ted to Google in order to deter­mine whether you are real­ly a human being. reCAPTCHA there­fore serves the secu­ri­ty of our web­site and con­se­quent­ly your secu­ri­ty. For exam­ple, with­out reCAPTCHA, it could hap­pen that a bot reg­is­ters as many e‑mail address­es as pos­si­ble dur­ing reg­is­tra­tion in order to “spam” forums or blogs with unwant­ed adver­tis­ing con­tent. With reCAPTCHA we can avoid such bot attacks. reCAPTCHA col­lects per­son­al data from users to deter­mine whether the actions on our web­site are actu­al­ly from peo­ple. Thus, the IP address and oth­er data that Google requires for the reCAPTCHA ser­vice can be sent to Google. IP address­es are almost always short­ened with­in the mem­ber states of the EU or oth­er sig­na­to­ry states to the Agree­ment on the Euro­pean Eco­nom­ic Area before the data lands on a serv­er in the USA. The IP address is not com­bined with any oth­er data held by Google unless you are signed in with your Google Account while using reCAPTCHA. First, the reCAPTCHA algo­rithm checks whether Google cook­ies from oth­er Google ser­vices (YouTube, Gmail, etc.) are already placed on your brows­er. Then reCAPTCHA sets an addi­tion­al cook­ie in your brows­er and takes a snap­shot of your brows­er win­dow. The fol­low­ing list of col­lect­ed brows­er and user data does not claim to be com­plete. Rather, they are exam­ples of data which, to our knowl­edge, are processed by Google. 
    • Refer­rer URL (the address of the page the vis­i­tor comes from)
    • IP address (i.e. 256.123.123.1)
    • Infor­ma­tion about the oper­at­ing sys­tem (the soft­ware that enables your com­put­er to oper­ate. Known oper­at­ing sys­tems are Win­dows, Mac OS X or Linux)
    • Cook­ies (small text files that store data in your browser)
    • Mouse and key­board behav­ior (every action you per­form with the mouse or key­board is stored)
    • Date and lan­guage set­tings (which lan­guage or date you have pre­set on your PC is stored)
    • All Javascript objects (JavaScript is a pro­gram­ming lan­guage that allows web­sites to adapt to the user. JavaScript objects can col­lect all kinds of data under one name)
    • Screen res­o­lu­tion (shows how many pix­els the image con­sists of)
    It is indis­putable that Google uses and ana­lyzes this data even before you click on the check­box “I am not a robot”. With the Invis­i­ble reCAPTCHA ver­sion even the tick­ing is omit­ted and the whole recog­ni­tion process runs in the back­ground. How much and what kind of data Google exact­ly stores is not known by Google in detail. If you do not want any data about you or your behav­iour to be trans­mit­ted to Google, you must log out of Google com­plete­ly and delete all Google cook­ies before you vis­it our web­site or use the reCAPTCHA soft­ware. In prin­ci­ple, the data is auto­mat­i­cal­ly trans­mit­ted to Google as soon as you vis­it our web­site. To delete this data again, you must con­tact Google sup­port at https://support.google.com/?hl=de&tid=331589808227. So when you use our web­site, you agree that Google LLC and its agents auto­mat­i­cal­ly col­lect, process and use data. You can learn more about reCAPTCHA on Google’s web devel­op­ment page at https://developers.google.com/recaptcha/.

6. Routine erasure and blocking of personal data

The data con­troller shall process and store the per­son­al data of the data sub­ject only for the peri­od nec­es­sary to achieve the pur­pose of stor­age, or as far as this is grant­ed by the Euro­pean leg­is­la­tor or oth­er leg­is­la­tors in laws or reg­u­la­tions to which the con­troller is sub­ject to. If the stor­age pur­pose is not applic­a­ble, or if a stor­age peri­od pre­scribed by the Euro­pean leg­is­la­tor or anoth­er com­pe­tent leg­is­la­tor expires, the per­son­al data are rou­tine­ly blocked or erased in accor­dance with legal require­ments.

7. Rights of the data subject

  • a) Right to confirmation

    Each data sub­ject shall have the right grant­ed by the Euro­pean leg­is­la­tor to obtain from the con­troller the con­fir­ma­tion as to whether or not per­son­al data con­cern­ing him or her are being processed. If a data sub­ject wish­es to avail him­self of this right of con­fir­ma­tion, he or she may, at any time, con­tact our Data Pro­tec­tion Offi­cer or anoth­er employ­ee of the controller.
  • b) Right to information

    Each data sub­ject shall have the right grant­ed by the Euro­pean leg­is­la­tor to obtain from the con­troller free infor­ma­tion about his or her per­son­al data stored at any time and a copy of this infor­ma­tion. Fur­ther­more, the Euro­pean direc­tives and reg­u­la­tions grant the data sub­ject access to the fol­low­ing information: 
    • the pur­pos­es of the processing;
    • the cat­e­gories of per­son­al data concerned;
    • the recip­i­ents or cat­e­gories of recip­i­ents to whom the per­son­al data have been or will be dis­closed, in par­tic­u­lar recip­i­ents in third coun­tries or inter­na­tion­al organisations;
    • where pos­si­ble, the envis­aged peri­od for which the per­son­al data will be stored, or, if not pos­si­ble, the cri­te­ria used to deter­mine that period;
    • the exis­tence of the right to request from the con­troller rec­ti­fi­ca­tion or era­sure of per­son­al data, or restric­tion of pro­cess­ing of per­son­al data con­cern­ing the data sub­ject, or to object to such processing;
    • the exis­tence of the right to lodge a com­plaint with a super­vi­so­ry authority;
    • where the per­son­al data are not col­lect­ed from the data sub­ject, any avail­able infor­ma­tion as to their source;
    • the exis­tence of auto­mat­ed deci­sion-mak­ing, includ­ing pro­fil­ing, referred to in Arti­cle 22(1) and (4) of the GDPR and, at least in those cas­es, mean­ing­ful infor­ma­tion about the log­ic involved, as well as the sig­nif­i­cance and envis­aged con­se­quences of such pro­cess­ing for the data subject.
    Fur­ther­more, the data sub­ject shall have a right to obtain infor­ma­tion as to whether per­son­al data are trans­ferred to a third coun­try or to an inter­na­tion­al organ­i­sa­tion. Where this is the case, the data sub­ject shall have the right to be informed of the appro­pri­ate safe­guards relat­ing to the trans­fer. If a data sub­ject wish­es to avail him­self of this right of access, he or she may at any time con­tact our Data Pro­tec­tion Offi­cer or anoth­er employ­ee of the controller.
  • c) Right of rectification

    Each data sub­ject shall have the right grant­ed by the Euro­pean leg­is­la­tor to obtain from the con­troller with­out undue delay the rec­ti­fi­ca­tion of inac­cu­rate per­son­al data con­cern­ing him or her. Tak­ing into account the pur­pos­es of the pro­cess­ing, the data sub­ject shall have the right to have incom­plete per­son­al data com­plet­ed, includ­ing by means of pro­vid­ing a sup­ple­men­tary state­ment. If a data sub­ject wish­es to exer­cise this right to rec­ti­fi­ca­tion, he or she may, at any time, con­tact our Data Pro­tec­tion Offi­cer or anoth­er employ­ee of the controller.
  • d) Right to erasure (Right to be forgotten)

    Each data sub­ject shall have the right grant­ed by the Euro­pean leg­is­la­tor to obtain from the con­troller the era­sure of per­son­al data con­cern­ing him or her with­out undue delay, and the con­troller shall have the oblig­a­tion to erase per­son­al data with­out undue delay where one of the fol­low­ing grounds applies, as long as the pro­cess­ing is not necessary: 
    • The per­son­al data are no longer nec­es­sary in rela­tion to the pur­pos­es for which they were col­lect­ed or oth­er­wise processed.
    • The data sub­ject with­draws con­sent to which the pro­cess­ing is based accord­ing to point (a) of Arti­cle 6(1) of the GDPR, or point (a) of Arti­cle 9(2) of the GDPR, and where there is no oth­er legal ground for the processing.
    • The data sub­ject objects to the pro­cess­ing pur­suant to Arti­cle 21(1) of the GDPR and there are no over­rid­ing legit­i­mate grounds for the pro­cess­ing, or the data sub­ject objects to the pro­cess­ing pur­suant to Arti­cle 21(2) of the GDPR.
    • The per­son­al data have been unlaw­ful­ly processed.
    • The per­son­al data must be erased for com­pli­ance with a legal oblig­a­tion in Union or Mem­ber State law to which the con­troller is subject.
    • The per­son­al data have been col­lect­ed in rela­tion to the offer of infor­ma­tion soci­ety ser­vices referred to in Arti­cle 8(1) of the GDPR.
    If one of the afore­men­tioned rea­sons applies, and a data sub­ject wish­es to request the era­sure of per­son­al data stored by the Micro­vista GmbH, he or she may at any time con­tact our Data Pro­tec­tion Offi­cer or anoth­er employ­ee of the con­troller. The Data Pro­tec­tion Offi­cer of the Micro­vista GmbH or anoth­er employ­ee shall prompt­ly ensure that the era­sure request is com­plied with imme­di­ate­ly. Where the con­troller has made per­son­al data pub­lic and is oblig­ed pur­suant to Arti­cle 17(1) to erase the per­son­al data, the con­troller, tak­ing account of avail­able tech­nol­o­gy and the cost of imple­men­ta­tion, shall take rea­son­able steps, includ­ing tech­ni­cal mea­sures, to inform oth­er con­trollers pro­cess­ing the per­son­al data that the data sub­ject has request­ed era­sure by such con­trollers of any links to, or copy or repli­ca­tion of, those per­son­al data, as far as pro­cess­ing is not required. The Data Pro­tec­tion Offi­cer of the Micro­vista GmbH or anoth­er employ­ee will arrange the nec­es­sary mea­sures in indi­vid­ual cases.
  • e)    Recht auf Einschränkung der Verarbeitung

    Each data sub­ject shall have the right grant­ed by the Euro­pean leg­is­la­tor to obtain from the con­troller restric­tion of pro­cess­ing where one of the fol­low­ing applies: 
    • The accu­ra­cy of the per­son­al data is con­test­ed by the data sub­ject, for a peri­od enabling the con­troller to ver­i­fy the accu­ra­cy of the per­son­al data.
    • The pro­cess­ing is unlaw­ful and the data sub­ject oppos­es the era­sure of the per­son­al data and requests instead the restric­tion of their use instead.
    • The con­troller no longer needs the per­son­al data for the pur­pos­es of the pro­cess­ing, but they are required by the data sub­ject for the estab­lish­ment, exer­cise or defence of legal claims.
    • The data sub­ject has object­ed to pro­cess­ing pur­suant to Arti­cle 21(1) of the GDPR pend­ing the ver­i­fi­ca­tion whether the legit­i­mate grounds of the con­troller over­ride those of the data subject.
    If one of the afore­men­tioned con­di­tions is met, and a data sub­ject wish­es to request the restric­tion of the pro­cess­ing of per­son­al data stored by the Micro­vista GmbH, he or she may at any time con­tact our Data Pro­tec­tion Offi­cer or anoth­er employ­ee of the con­troller. The Data Pro­tec­tion Offi­cer of the Micro­vista GmbH or anoth­er employ­ee will arrange the restric­tion of the processing.
  • f) Right to data portability

    Each data sub­ject shall have the right grant­ed by the Euro­pean leg­is­la­tor, to receive the per­son­al data con­cern­ing him or her, which was pro­vid­ed to a con­troller, in a struc­tured, com­mon­ly used and machine-read­able for­mat. He or she shall have the right to trans­mit those data to anoth­er con­troller with­out hin­drance from the con­troller to which the per­son­al data have been pro­vid­ed, as long as the pro­cess­ing is based on con­sent pur­suant to point (a) of Arti­cle 6(1) of the GDPR or point (a) of Arti­cle 9(2) of the GDPR, or on a con­tract pur­suant to point (b) of Arti­cle 6(1) of the GDPR, and the pro­cess­ing is car­ried out by auto­mat­ed means, as long as the pro­cess­ing is not nec­es­sary for the per­for­mance of a task car­ried out in the pub­lic inter­est or in the exer­cise of offi­cial author­i­ty vest­ed in the con­troller. Fur­ther­more, in exer­cis­ing his or her right to data porta­bil­i­ty pur­suant to Arti­cle 20(1) of the GDPR, the data sub­ject shall have the right to have per­son­al data trans­mit­ted direct­ly from one con­troller to anoth­er, where tech­ni­cal­ly fea­si­ble and when doing so does not adverse­ly affect the rights and free­doms of oth­ers. In order to assert the right to data porta­bil­i­ty, the data sub­ject may at any time con­tact the Data Pro­tec­tion Offi­cer des­ig­nat­ed by the Micro­vista GmbH or anoth­er employee.
  • g) Right to object

    Each data sub­ject shall have the right grant­ed by the Euro­pean leg­is­la­tor to object, on grounds relat­ing to his or her par­tic­u­lar sit­u­a­tion, at any time, to pro­cess­ing of per­son­al data con­cern­ing him or her, which is based on point (e) or (f) of Arti­cle 6(1) of the GDPR. This also applies to pro­fil­ing based on these pro­vi­sions. The Micro­vista GmbH shall no longer process the per­son­al data in the event of the objec­tion, unless we can demon­strate com­pelling legit­i­mate grounds for the pro­cess­ing which over­ride the inter­ests, rights and free­doms of the data sub­ject, or for the estab­lish­ment, exer­cise or defence of legal claims. If the Micro­vista GmbH process­es per­son­al data for direct mar­ket­ing pur­pos­es, the data sub­ject shall have the right to object at any time to pro­cess­ing of per­son­al data con­cern­ing him or her for such mar­ket­ing. This applies to pro­fil­ing to the extent that it is relat­ed to such direct mar­ket­ing. If the data sub­ject objects to the Micro­vista GmbH to the pro­cess­ing for direct mar­ket­ing pur­pos­es, the Micro­vista GmbH will no longer process the per­son­al data for these pur­pos­es. In addi­tion, the data sub­ject has the right, on grounds relat­ing to his or her par­tic­u­lar sit­u­a­tion, to object to pro­cess­ing of per­son­al data con­cern­ing him or her by the Micro­vista GmbH for sci­en­tif­ic or his­tor­i­cal research pur­pos­es, or for sta­tis­ti­cal pur­pos­es pur­suant to Arti­cle 89(1) of the GDPR, unless the pro­cess­ing is nec­es­sary for the per­for­mance of a task car­ried out for rea­sons of pub­lic inter­est. In order to exer­cise the right to object, the data sub­ject may direct­ly con­tact the Data Pro­tec­tion Offi­cer of the Micro­vista GmbH or anoth­er employ­ee. In addi­tion, the data sub­ject is free in the con­text of the use of infor­ma­tion soci­ety ser­vices, and notwith­stand­ing Direc­tive 2002/58/EC, to use his or her right to object by auto­mat­ed means using tech­ni­cal specifications.
  • h) Automated decisions in individual cases including profiling

    Each data sub­ject shall have the right grant­ed by the Euro­pean leg­is­la­tor not to be sub­ject to a deci­sion based sole­ly on auto­mat­ed pro­cess­ing, includ­ing pro­fil­ing, which pro­duces legal effects con­cern­ing him or her, or sim­i­lar­ly sig­nif­i­cant­ly affects him or her, as long as the deci­sion (1) is not is nec­es­sary for enter­ing into, or the per­for­mance of, a con­tract between the data sub­ject and a data con­troller, or (2) is not autho­rised by Union or Mem­ber State law to which the con­troller is sub­ject and which also lays down suit­able mea­sures to safe­guard the data subject’s rights and free­doms and legit­i­mate inter­ests, or (3) is not based on the data subject’s explic­it con­sent. If the deci­sion (1) is nec­es­sary for enter­ing into, or the per­for­mance of, a con­tract between the data sub­ject and a data con­troller, or (2) it is based on the data subject’s explic­it con­sent, the Micro­vista GmbH shall imple­ment suit­able mea­sures to safe­guard the data subject’s rights and free­doms and legit­i­mate inter­ests, at least the right to obtain human inter­ven­tion on the part of the con­troller, to express his or her point of view and con­test the deci­sion. If the data sub­ject wish­es to exer­cise the rights con­cern­ing auto­mat­ed indi­vid­ual deci­sion-mak­ing, he or she may at any time direct­ly con­tact our Data Pro­tec­tion Offi­cer of the Micro­vista GmbH or anoth­er employ­ee of the controller.
  • i) Right to revoke consent under data protection law

    Each data sub­ject shall have the right grant­ed by the Euro­pean leg­is­la­tor to with­draw his or her con­sent to pro­cess­ing of his or her per­son­al data at any time. If the data sub­ject wish­es to exer­cise the right to with­draw the con­sent, he or she may at any time direct­ly con­tact our Data Pro­tec­tion Offi­cer of the Micro­vista GmbH or anoth­er employ­ee of the controller.

8. Data protection for applications and the application procedures

The data con­troller shall col­lect and process the per­son­al data of appli­cants for the pur­pose of the pro­cess­ing of the appli­ca­tion pro­ce­dure. The pro­cess­ing may also be car­ried out elec­tron­i­cal­ly. This is the case, in par­tic­u­lar, if an appli­cant sub­mits cor­re­spond­ing appli­ca­tion doc­u­ments by e‑mail or by means of a web form on the web­site to the con­troller. If the data con­troller con­cludes an employ­ment con­tract with an appli­cant, the sub­mit­ted data will be stored for the pur­pose of pro­cess­ing the employ­ment rela­tion­ship in com­pli­ance with legal require­ments. If no employ­ment con­tract is con­clud­ed with the appli­cant by the con­troller, the appli­ca­tion doc­u­ments shall be auto­mat­i­cal­ly erased two months after noti­fi­ca­tion of the refusal deci­sion, pro­vid­ed that no oth­er legit­i­mate inter­ests of the con­troller are opposed to the era­sure. Oth­er legit­i­mate inter­est in this rela­tion is, e.g. a bur­den of proof in a pro­ce­dure under the Gen­er­al Equal Treat­ment Act (AGG).

9. Data protection provisions about the application and use of Google Analytics (with anonymization function)

On this web­site, the con­troller has inte­grat­ed the com­po­nent of Google Ana­lyt­ics (with the anonymiz­er func­tion). Google Ana­lyt­ics is a web ana­lyt­ics ser­vice. Web ana­lyt­ics is the col­lec­tion, gath­er­ing, and analy­sis of data about the behav­ior of vis­i­tors to web­sites. A web analy­sis ser­vice col­lects, inter alia, data about the web­site from which a per­son has come (the so-called refer­rer), which sub-pages were vis­it­ed, or how often and for what dura­tion a sub-page was viewed. Web ana­lyt­ics are main­ly used for the opti­miza­tion of a web­site and in order to car­ry out a cost-ben­e­fit analy­sis of Inter­net adver­tis­ing. The oper­a­tor of the Google Ana­lyt­ics com­po­nent is Google Inc., 1600 Amphithe­atre Pkwy, Moun­tain View, CA 94043–1351, Unit­ed States. For the web ana­lyt­ics through Google Ana­lyt­ics the con­troller uses the appli­ca­tion “_gat. _anonymizeIp”. By means of this appli­ca­tion the IP address of the Inter­net con­nec­tion of the data sub­ject is abridged by Google and anonymised when access­ing our web­sites from a Mem­ber State of the Euro­pean Union or anoth­er Con­tract­ing State to the Agree­ment on the Euro­pean Eco­nom­ic Area. The pur­pose of the Google Ana­lyt­ics com­po­nent is to ana­lyze the traf­fic on our web­site. Google uses the col­lect­ed data and infor­ma­tion, inter alia, to eval­u­ate the use of our web­site and to pro­vide online reports, which show the activ­i­ties on our web­sites, and to pro­vide oth­er ser­vices con­cern­ing the use of our Inter­net site for us. Google Ana­lyt­ics places a cook­ie on the infor­ma­tion tech­nol­o­gy sys­tem of the data sub­ject. The def­i­n­i­tion of cook­ies is explained above. With the set­ting of the cook­ie, Google is enabled to ana­lyze the use of our web­site. With each call-up to one of the indi­vid­ual pages of this Inter­net site, which is oper­at­ed by the con­troller and into which a Google Ana­lyt­ics com­po­nent was inte­grat­ed, the Inter­net brows­er on the infor­ma­tion tech­nol­o­gy sys­tem of the data sub­ject will auto­mat­i­cal­ly sub­mit data through the Google Ana­lyt­ics com­po­nent for the pur­pose of online adver­tis­ing and the set­tle­ment of com­mis­sions to Google. Dur­ing the course of this tech­ni­cal pro­ce­dure, the enter­prise Google gains knowl­edge of per­son­al infor­ma­tion, such as the IP address of the data sub­ject, which serves Google, inter alia, to under­stand the ori­gin of vis­i­tors and clicks, and sub­se­quent­ly cre­ate com­mis­sion set­tle­ments. The cook­ie is used to store per­son­al infor­ma­tion, such as the access time, the loca­tion from which the access was made, and the fre­quen­cy of vis­its of our web­site by the data sub­ject. With each vis­it to our Inter­net site, such per­son­al data, includ­ing the IP address of the Inter­net access used by the data sub­ject, will be trans­mit­ted to Google in the Unit­ed States of Amer­i­ca. These per­son­al data are stored by Google in the Unit­ed States of Amer­i­ca. Google may pass these per­son­al data col­lect­ed through the tech­ni­cal pro­ce­dure to third par­ties. The data sub­ject may, as stat­ed above, pre­vent the set­ting of cook­ies through our web­site at any time by means of a cor­re­spond­ing adjust­ment of the web brows­er used and thus per­ma­nent­ly deny the set­ting of cook­ies. Such an adjust­ment to the Inter­net brows­er used would also pre­vent Google Ana­lyt­ics from set­ting a cook­ie on the infor­ma­tion tech­nol­o­gy sys­tem of the data sub­ject. In addi­tion, cook­ies already in use by Google Ana­lyt­ics may be delet­ed at any time via a web brows­er or oth­er soft­ware pro­grams. In addi­tion, the data sub­ject has the pos­si­bil­i­ty of object­ing to a col­lec­tion of data that are gen­er­at­ed by Google Ana­lyt­ics, which is relat­ed to the use of this web­site, as well as the pro­cess­ing of this data by Google and the chance to pre­clude any such. For this pur­pose, the data sub­ject must down­load a brows­er add-on under the link https://tools.google.com/dlpage/gaoptout and install it. This brows­er add-on tells Google Ana­lyt­ics through a JavaScript, that any data and infor­ma­tion about the vis­its of Inter­net pages may not be trans­mit­ted to Google Ana­lyt­ics. The instal­la­tion of the brows­er add-ons is con­sid­ered an objec­tion by Google. If the infor­ma­tion tech­nol­o­gy sys­tem of the data sub­ject is lat­er delet­ed, for­mat­ted, or new­ly installed, then the data sub­ject must rein­stall the brows­er add-ons to dis­able Google Ana­lyt­ics. If the brows­er add-on was unin­stalled by the data sub­ject or any oth­er per­son who is attrib­ut­able to their sphere of com­pe­tence, or is dis­abled, it is pos­si­ble to exe­cute the rein­stal­la­tion or reac­ti­va­tion of the brows­er add-ons. Fur­ther infor­ma­tion and the applic­a­ble data pro­tec­tion pro­vi­sions of Google may be retrieved under https://www.google.com/intl/en/policies/privacy/ and under http://www.google.com/analytics/terms/us.html. Google Ana­lyt­ics is fur­ther explained under the fol­low­ing Link https://www.google.com/analytics/. genauer erläutert.

10. Privacy policy on the deployment and use of Google Ads

The data con­troller has inte­grat­ed Google Ads on this web­site. Google Ads is an inter­net adver­tis­ing ser­vice that allows adver­tis­ers to dis­play ads in Google’s search engine results as well as in the Google adver­tis­ing net­work. Google Ads allows an adver­tis­er to pre­de­fine key­words that will cause an ad to appear in Google’s search engine results only when the user uses the search engine to retrieve a key­word rel­e­vant search result. In the Google adver­tis­ing net­work, the ads are dis­trib­uted to top­ic-relat­ed web­sites by means of an auto­mat­ic algo­rithm and in accor­dance with the pre­vi­ous­ly defined key­words. The oper­at­ing com­pa­ny of the Google Ads ser­vices is Google Inc, 1600 Amphithe­atre Pkwy, Moun­tain View, CA 94043–1351, USA. The pur­pose of Google Ads is to adver­tise our web­site by dis­play­ing inter­est-rel­e­vant adver­tis­ing on the web­sites of third-par­ty com­pa­nies and in the search engine results of the Google search engine, and by dis­play­ing third-par­ty adver­tis­ing on our web­site. If a per­son con­cerned vis­its our web­site via a Google ad, a so-called con­ver­sion cook­ie is stored on the infor­ma­tion tech­nol­o­gy sys­tem of the per­son con­cerned by Google. What cook­ies are has already been explained above. A con­ver­sion cook­ie los­es its valid­i­ty after thir­ty days and does not serve to iden­ti­fy the data sub­ject. If the cook­ie has not expired, the con­ver­sion cook­ie is used to deter­mine whether cer­tain sub-pages, for exam­ple the shop­ping bas­ket from an online shop sys­tem, have been called up on our web­site. The con­ver­sion cook­ie enables both we and Google to track whether a per­son who has reached our web­site via an AdWords ad has gen­er­at­ed sales, i.e. whether he or she has com­plet­ed or can­celled a pur­chase. The data and infor­ma­tion col­lect­ed through the use of the con­ver­sion cook­ie is used by Google to gen­er­ate vis­it sta­tis­tics for our web­site. These vis­it sta­tis­tics are in turn used by us to deter­mine the total num­ber of users who were referred to us via AdWords ads, i.e. to deter­mine the suc­cess or fail­ure of the respec­tive AdWords ad and to opti­mize our AdWords ads for the future. Nei­ther our com­pa­ny nor oth­er adver­tis­ing cus­tomers of Google Ads receive infor­ma­tion from Google that could be used to iden­ti­fy the per­son con­cerned. Per­son­al infor­ma­tion, for exam­ple the Inter­net pages vis­it­ed by the per­son con­cerned, is stored by means of the con­ver­sion cook­ie. Each time our web­site is vis­it­ed, per­son­al data, includ­ing the IP address of the Inter­net con­nec­tion used by the per­son con­cerned, is trans­mit­ted to Google in the Unit­ed States of Amer­i­ca. This per­son­al data is stored by Google in the Unit­ed States of Amer­i­ca. Google may pass on this per­son­al data col­lect­ed by the tech­ni­cal process to third par­ties. The per­son con­cerned can pre­vent the set­ting of cook­ies by our web­site, as described above, at any time by means of a cor­re­spond­ing set­ting in the Inter­net brows­er used and thus per­ma­nent­ly object to the set­ting of cook­ies. Such a set­ting of the Inter­net brows­er used would also pre­vent Google from set­ting a con­ver­sion cook­ie on the infor­ma­tion tech­nol­o­gy sys­tem of the per­son con­cerned. In addi­tion, a cook­ie already set by Google AdWords can be delet­ed at any time via the Inter­net brows­er or oth­er soft­ware pro­grams. Fur­ther­more, the per­son con­cerned has the oppor­tu­ni­ty to object to inter­est-based adver­tis­ing by Google. To do so, the per­son con­cerned must access www.google.de/settings/ads from each of the Inter­net browsers he or she uses and make the desired set­tings there. More infor­ma­tion and Google’s applic­a­ble pri­va­cy pol­i­cy can be found at https://www.google.de/intl/de/policies/privacy/.

11. Use of Google Remarketing

We also use the remar­ket­ing func­tion of Google. This allows us to serve you per­son­al­ized adver­tis­ing in appro­pri­ate ad spaces on oth­er web­sites based on the inter­ests you have shown on our web­site. This pos­si­bil­i­ty is lim­it­ed to a max­i­mum of 18 months. You can find fur­ther infor­ma­tion on this here: Google’s Data Pri­va­cy State­ment.You can pre­vent inter­est-based adver­tis­ing through the use of this brows­er plu­g­in (instal­la­tion).

12. Legal basis of the processing

Art. 6(1) lit. a GDPR serves as the legal basis for pro­cess­ing oper­a­tions for which we obtain con­sent for a spe­cif­ic pro­cess­ing pur­pose. If the pro­cess­ing of per­son­al data is nec­es­sary for the per­for­mance of a con­tract to which the data sub­ject is par­ty, as is the case, for exam­ple, when pro­cess­ing oper­a­tions are nec­es­sary for the sup­ply of goods or to pro­vide any oth­er ser­vice, the pro­cess­ing is based on Arti­cle 6(1) lit. b GDPR. The same applies to such pro­cess­ing oper­a­tions which are nec­es­sary for car­ry­ing out pre-con­trac­tu­al mea­sures, for exam­ple in the case of inquiries con­cern­ing our prod­ucts or ser­vices. Is our com­pa­ny sub­ject to a legal oblig­a­tion by which pro­cess­ing of per­son­al data is required, such as for the ful­fill­ment of tax oblig­a­tions, the pro­cess­ing is based on Art. 6(1) lit. c GDPR. In rare cas­es, the pro­cess­ing of per­son­al data may be nec­es­sary to pro­tect the vital inter­ests of the data sub­ject or of anoth­er nat­ur­al per­son. This would be the case, for exam­ple, if a vis­i­tor were injured in our com­pa­ny and his name, age, health insur­ance data or oth­er vital infor­ma­tion would have to be passed on to a doc­tor, hos­pi­tal or oth­er third par­ty. Then the pro­cess­ing would be based on Art. 6(1) lit. d GDPR. Final­ly, pro­cess­ing oper­a­tions could be based on Arti­cle 6(1) lit. f GDPR. This legal basis is used for pro­cess­ing oper­a­tions which are not cov­ered by any of the above­men­tioned legal grounds, if pro­cess­ing is nec­es­sary for the pur­pos­es of the legit­i­mate inter­ests pur­sued by our com­pa­ny or by a third par­ty, except where such inter­ests are over­rid­den by the inter­ests or fun­da­men­tal rights and free­doms of the data sub­ject which require pro­tec­tion of per­son­al data. Such pro­cess­ing oper­a­tions are par­tic­u­lar­ly per­mis­si­ble because they have been specif­i­cal­ly men­tioned by the Euro­pean leg­is­la­tor. He con­sid­ered that a legit­i­mate inter­est could be assumed if the data sub­ject is a client of the con­troller (Recital 47 Sen­tence 2 GDPR).

13. Legitimate interests in the processing pursued by the controller or a third party

Where the pro­cess­ing of per­son­al data is based on Arti­cle 6(1) lit. f GDPR our legit­i­mate inter­est is to car­ry out our busi­ness in favor of the well-being of all our employ­ees and the share­hold­ers.

14. The duration for which the personal data are stored

The cri­te­ria used to deter­mine the peri­od of stor­age of per­son­al data is the respec­tive statu­to­ry reten­tion peri­od. After expi­ra­tion of that peri­od, the cor­re­spond­ing data is rou­tine­ly delet­ed, as long as it is no longer nec­es­sary for the ful­fill­ment of the con­tract or the ini­ti­a­tion of a con­tract.

15. Legal or contractual provisions making the personal data available; necessity for the conclusion of the contract; obligation of the data subject to provide the personal data; possible consequences of nonprovision

We clar­i­fy that the pro­vi­sion of per­son­al data is part­ly required by law (e.g. tax reg­u­la­tions) or can also result from con­trac­tu­al pro­vi­sions (e.g. infor­ma­tion on the con­trac­tu­al part­ner). Some­times it may be nec­es­sary to con­clude a con­tract that the data sub­ject pro­vides us with per­son­al data, which must sub­se­quent­ly be processed by us. The data sub­ject is, for exam­ple, oblig­ed to pro­vide us with per­son­al data when our com­pa­ny signs a con­tract with him or her. The non-pro­vi­sion of the per­son­al data would have the con­se­quence that the con­tract with the data sub­ject could not be con­clud­ed. Before per­son­al data is pro­vid­ed by the data sub­ject, the data sub­ject must con­tact our Data Pro­tec­tion Offi­cer. Our Data Pro­tec­tion Offi­cer clar­i­fies to the data sub­ject whether the pro­vi­sion of the per­son­al data is required by law or con­tract or is nec­es­sary for the con­clu­sion of the con­tract, whether there is an oblig­a­tion to pro­vide the per­son­al data and the con­se­quences of non-pro­vi­sion of the per­son­al data.

16. The existence of automated decision making

As a respon­si­ble com­pa­ny, we do not use auto­mat­ic deci­sion-mak­ing or pro­fil­ing.

17. Subscription to our newsletter

On the Micro­vista GmbH web­site, users are giv­en the oppor­tu­ni­ty to sub­scribe to our com­pa­ny newslet­ter. The input mask used for this pur­pose indi­cates which per­son­al data is trans­ferred to the per­son respon­si­ble for pro­cess­ing when order­ing the newslet­ter. Micro­vista GmbH informs its cus­tomers and busi­ness part­ners at reg­u­lar inter­vals by means of a newslet­ter about com­pa­ny offers. The newslet­ter of our com­pa­ny can basi­cal­ly only be received by the per­son con­cerned if (1) the per­son con­cerned has a valid e‑mail address and (2) the per­son con­cerned reg­is­ters for the newslet­ter mail­ing. For legal rea­sons, a con­fir­ma­tion e‑mail will be sent to the e‑mail address first reg­is­tered by a data sub­ject for newslet­ter dis­patch using the dou­ble opt-in pro­ce­dure. This con­fir­ma­tion e‑mail is used to check whether the own­er of the e‑mail address, as the data sub­ject, has autho­rized the receipt of the newslet­ter. When reg­is­ter­ing for the newslet­ter, we also save the IP address assigned by the Inter­net Ser­vice Provider (ISP) of the com­put­er sys­tem used by the per­son con­cerned at the time of reg­is­tra­tion, as well as the date and time of reg­is­tra­tion. The col­lec­tion of this data is nec­es­sary in order to be able to trace the (pos­si­ble) mis­use of the e‑mail address of a data sub­ject at a lat­er date and there­fore serves to pro­vide legal pro­tec­tion for the per­son respon­si­ble for pro­cess­ing. The per­son­al data col­lect­ed dur­ing reg­is­tra­tion for the newslet­ter is used exclu­sive­ly for send­ing our newslet­ter. In addi­tion, sub­scribers to the newslet­ter could be informed by e‑mail if this is nec­es­sary for the oper­a­tion of the newslet­ter ser­vice or for reg­is­tra­tion, as could be the case if there are changes to the newslet­ter offer or if tech­ni­cal con­di­tions change. The per­son­al data col­lect­ed with­in the scope of the newslet­ter ser­vice will not be passed on to third par­ties. The sub­scrip­tion to our newslet­ter can be can­celled by the per­son con­cerned at any time. The con­sent to the stor­age of per­son­al data, which the per­son con­cerned has giv­en us for the newslet­ter ser­vice, can be revoked at any time. For the pur­pose of revok­ing this con­sent, a cor­re­spond­ing link can be found in every newslet­ter. It is also pos­si­ble to unsub­scribe from the newslet­ter at any time direct­ly on the web­site of the data con­troller or to inform the data con­troller in anoth­er way.

18. Newsletter Tracking

The newslet­ters of Micro­vista GmbH con­tain so-called count­ing pix­els. A track­ing pix­el is a minia­ture graph­ic embed­ded in e‑mails sent in HTML for­mat to enable log file record­ing and log file analy­sis. This enables a sta­tis­ti­cal eval­u­a­tion of the suc­cess or fail­ure of online mar­ket­ing cam­paigns. Using the embed­ded pix­el-code, Micro­vista GmbH can iden­ti­fy whether and when an e‑mail was opened by a per­son con­cerned and which links con­tained in the e‑mail were called up by the per­son con­cerned. Such per­son­al data col­lect­ed via the track­ing pix­els con­tained in the newslet­ters are stored and eval­u­at­ed by the data con­troller in order to opti­mise the newslet­ter dis­patch and to adapt the con­tent of future newslet­ters even bet­ter to the inter­ests of the data sub­ject. This per­son­al data is not passed on to third par­ties. Data sub­jects are enti­tled at any time to revoke the sep­a­rate dec­la­ra­tion of con­sent giv­en in this regard via the dou­ble opt-in pro­ce­dure. After revo­ca­tion, these per­son­al data will be delet­ed by the data con­troller. Micro­vista GmbH auto­mat­i­cal­ly inter­prets a can­cel­la­tion of receipt of the newslet­ter as a revo­ca­tion. This Pri­va­cy Pol­i­cy has been gen­er­at­ed by the Pri­va­cy Pol­i­cy Gen­er­a­tor of the Exter­nal Data Pro­tec­tion Offi­cers that was devel­oped in coop­er­a­tion with the Media Law Lawyers from WBS-LAW. If you have any ques­tions about our pri­va­cy pol­i­cy or the data we store, please con­tact us at the fol­low­ing e‑mail address dsb@netco.de.

Datenschutzbeauftragter:

IZAG gGmbH Dipl. Ing. Ralph Anger­stein Schleinitzstr. 7 38889 Blanken­burg (Harz) Ger­many E‑Mail: dsb@netco.de Phone: +49 3917 2757277 
Automated inspection of hairpins

Challenge:

The stability of the hairpin joint is crucial for the reliability of electrically powered vehicles. Laser welding can be carried out according to different principles. However, this can affect the quality of the joint by process fluctuations resulting in undesired deviations.

Possible consequences:
Due to ambiguity in the quality of joints, high
failure rates can occur.

Advantages of a CT inspection:

  • Quality feedback within minutes
  • Statistically evaluable results thanks to Microvista's automatic analysis: 40 stators/day inspected
  • Only 165 €/part including an informative report.
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CT Scan exposing a burnt out battery
Pore analysis of a cylinder head

Challenge:

In order to achieve the highest possible ranges as well as low emissions, lightweight construction continues to be a primary goal in vehicle construction, regardless of the type of drive. Light metal casting is characterised by its ability to produce complex parts with a high degree of automation and recyclability. However, high technological demands are placed on the components, including mechanical load-bearing capacity under more complex stresses and simultaneous mass reduction.

Potential consequences:

A cylinder with poor quality leads to damage to the cooling system and ultimately to engine failure.

 

Advantages of a CT inspection:

  • Visualisation of pores in the cylinder head and colour classification of the pores according to their volume is possible.
  •  The exact position of each pore and thus the potential risk it poses can be determined.
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Testing of wall thicknesses of an exhaust manifold.

Challenge:

The exhaust manifold is one of the most heavily loaded components of an engine. For this reason, the actual and desired condition of the wall thickness should be compared. Only with a sufficient wall thickness can the manifold withstand the shock-like inflow of exhaust gases and the resulting pressure front, as well as the many heating and cooling cycles in the long term.  

Possible consequences of undetected deviations:

The notch effect of blowholes can cause a crack in the manifold. Partial breakthroughs can also occur if the wall thickness is too small. This leads to a change in the pressure conditions in the manifold, which reduces engine performance and, at the same time, increases fuel consumption. In addition, there is a high noise level from the direction of the engine and a clearly perceptible exhaust smell in the interior.

Advantages of a CT inspection:

  • Fast and automatic detection of relevant quality defects 
  • Avoidance of scrap refinement 
  • Detection of defect focal points through statistical evaluation of the results.
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CT Scan exposing a burnt pores in aluminium wheel
Assembly inspection of lithium-ion batteries.

Challenge:

Due to production or assembly errors, the contact, insulation and electrolyte foil is damaged in some batteries.

Possible consequences:

A short circuit can be the result. This can lead to a high thermal reaction of the electrolyte. The resulting outgassing causes the battery to swell externally. Inflated, deformed, outgassed lithium-containing batteries can lead to explosions and fires.

Advantages of CT testing:

  • Dismantling of batteries in small devices is not necessary for the test. The devices can therefore be used immediately after the test
  • By sorting out defective batteries, higher quality can be guaranteed, and prevention against legal disputes and negative press in case of a fire can be operated
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CT Scan exposing a burnt out battery
Comprehensive inspection of an aluminium wheel carrier with complex bionic structure.

Challenge:

Additive manufacturing requires carefully set process parameters that are optimised in iterative steps during the product development process. Fast and comprehensive feedback on product quality is of paramount importance for shortening the development phase.

Possible consequences of undetected defects:

Missing and insufficiently validated process quality can result in high reject rates. Especially with regard to safety-relevant parts of the chassis, additional risks arise that can lead to component failure and create the risk of an accident.

Advantages of CT inspection:

  • Shortened development cycles
  • Addressing risks identified by FMEA
  • Reduction of required expensive prototypes through non-destructive testing for a variety of features.
Comprehensive inspection of an aluminium wheel carrier with complex bionic structure.

Challenge:

Additive manufacturing requires carefully set process parameters that are optimised in iterative steps during the product development process. Fast and comprehensive feedback on product quality is of paramount importance for shortening the development phase.

Possible consequences of undetected defects:

Missing and insufficiently validated process quality can result in high reject rates. Especially with regard to safety-relevant parts of the chassis, additional risks arise that can lead to component failure and create the risk of an accident.

Advantages of CT inspection:

  • Shortened development cycles
  • Addressing risks identified by FMEA
  • Reduction of required expensive prototypes through non-destructive testing for a variety of features.
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A CT scan of insulation foam
Assembly inspection of medical devices

Challenge:

To detect malfunctions, damage or collisions that cannot be traced after disassembly of the medical device. 

Possible consequences:

Blockages can cause some devices to malfunction during use.

Advantages of a CT scan:
Complete digitisation takes place without the application of force during the measurement, which makes it possible to measure, analyse as well as subsequently process filigree and soft components. The inspection takes place quickly and reliably in the assembled state. During the evaluation, the movements in the component can be recorded, whereby the blockage can be found.

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A CT scan of XXX XXX